IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

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Spinoza
Posts: 261
Joined: 7 months ago

IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by Spinoza » 2 months ago

Haven’t had a chance to go to a jeweler yet but there is a marking on a necklace that has me a bit concerned so maybe someone here can clear it up for me. 🤞

I bought a “test piece” gold necklace from SLC a month or so ago and it was advertised as 10K. Sure enough, when I checked it, the 10K stamp was there. BUT there’s also a second stamp that reads “IGS”.🫤

Is “IGS” simply the maker’s initials/mark? 🤔

Or is “IGS” an identifier for a type of “Gold Shell”? 🤔

I searched the internet for markings that are used to identify gold but I couldn’t find “IGS”, only “GS” (Gold Shell). Still, I’m a bit skeptical and I don’t want to purchase more SLC gold until I’m sure it’s SOLID gold. The terminology hosts’ use — or don’t use — sometimes varies even within the same presentation! 🙄

Thanks in advance for any help clearing this up for me! 😁✌️
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Mapper
Posts: 108
Joined: 1 year ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by Mapper » 2 months ago

Spinoza wrote:
2 months ago
Haven’t had a chance to go to a jeweler yet but there is a marking on a necklace that has me a bit concerned so maybe someone here can clear it up for me. 🤞

I bought a “test piece” gold necklace from SLC a month or so ago and it was advertised as 10K. Sure enough, when I checked it, the 10K stamp was there. BUT there’s also a second stamp that reads “IGS”.🫤

Is “IGS” simply the maker’s initials/mark? 🤔

Or is “IGS” an identifier for a type of “Gold Shell”? 🤔

I searched the internet for markings that are used to identify gold but I couldn’t find “IGS”, only “GS” (Gold Shell). Still, I’m a bit skeptical and I don’t want to purchase more SLC gold until I’m sure it’s SOLID gold. The terminology hosts’ use — or don’t use — sometimes varies even within the same presentation! 🙄

Thanks in advance for any help clearing this up for me! 😁✌️
IGS is the manufacturer.
http://www.igslaboratory.com/index.html
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joshuatheemerald
Posts: 149
Joined: 11 months ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by joshuatheemerald » 2 months ago

Interesting information that you’ve shared! I do not buy gold via LC but this was very insightful to hear about.
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Spinoza
Posts: 261
Joined: 7 months ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by Spinoza » 2 months ago

@Mapper —

Thanks so much! 👍 WHEW! That’s very reassuring — even though their website is full of spelling and grammatical errors. 🤣

My bad for not searching for manufacturers. DUH.😳 I just searched for gold marks and only went down that rabbit hole! 😁✌️

@joshuatheemerald —

It’s worth verifying everything and then sharing info. Everybody wins! 😁✌️
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joshuatheemerald
Posts: 149
Joined: 11 months ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by joshuatheemerald » 2 months ago

Is the manufacturer of gold an important stamp/indicator? I am genuinely curious as to what importance it holds, if any!
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WTFarmGirl
Posts: 130
Joined: 6 months ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by WTFarmGirl » 2 months ago

joshuatheemerald wrote:
2 months ago
Is the manufacturer of gold an important stamp/indicator? I am genuinely curious as to what importance it holds, if any!
manufacturers rarely stamp items they make. In this case, it's likely an item they designed IN HOUSE and that's why they added their stamp to it. A bit like an advertiser's mark. If they bought the chains at an event such as Tucson, then they won't have SLC's mark on them, but rather some other identifying mark.

Interestingly enough, one casting company I ordered from stamped my ring with 925 (sterling silver), while the other added no mark at all . . .

Now on the other hand, if a casting company is KNOWN for having flaws in their casts, then a production mark like this might be useful to identify it. But chances are, any company mass-producing items will have the casting process down exactly and produce good quality casts... of course there could always be the exception..
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Spinoza
Posts: 261
Joined: 7 months ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by Spinoza » 2 months ago

@joshuatheemerald

Yep, a manufacturer’s mark can be important. After all, which would you trust to be of higher quality and workmanship? A well known, well respected manufacturer like Tiffany or some unfamiliar company based in India (IGS) with their poorly written website? 🫤 The U.S. has required maker’s marks since 1961.

Per the well known Heritage Auctions (“America’s Auction House”) here’s some info that you may find helpful:

“A Maker's Mark is a unique stamp placed on jewelry and watches to ensure the authenticity of the manufacturer. These stamps are typically made up of the manufacturers initials, name, or another unique representative symbol. Identifying this mark is the first step in determining the value of a piece of jewelry. In addition to Maker's Marks, some countries require hallmarks, which are given by the country where manufacturing took place. Hallmarks can offer further information about the place of origin, date of manufacture, and metal content.”

And here’s additional info from the site:

“What do stamps on gold jewelry mean?”

Besides the maker's mark, there is also a gold purity mark showing the percentage of pure gold in the piece. For example, "14K" may also be represented as "585", meaning it is 58.5% (14/24) pure gold. In the US, jewelers have been required to stamp a purity mark on their pieces since 1906, and in 1961 the US required a maker's mark.”

So not only are maker’s marks a requirement in the US since 1961, the lack of a maker’s mark can be an indication that the gold isn’t real or a big red flag that it isn’t as pure as the purity mark indicates. (Of course the karat mark and maker’s mark could possibly have worn off from heavy use or possibly because the piece was created prior to 1961. A good jeweler can determine that for you.)

Heritage Auctions also has an extensive database of the most well-known maker’s marks if you’d like to check it out. Not surprisingly, IGS isn’t on it! 🫤 This, to me, explains part of the reason SLC sells much of their gold at lower than average prices; the manufacturer isn’t a high quality name. ☹️

Anyway, here’s the website: jewelry.ha.com

And to further emphasize the importance of manufacture’s marks, this is from the Goldmania (N.Y.) website (Goldmaniajewelry.com)

“Understanding Hallmarking:

Hallmarks play a crucial role in gold jewelry stamp identification, helping you recognize the manufacturer of a product. They're like a signature, indicating who crafted the item. Manufacturers stamp their products with hallmarks to confirm authenticity. It's a mark of pride and a way for consumers to trust that they're getting a genuine product from a specific maker. So, when you spot that gold jewelry stamp, you're not just holding a piece of jewelry but a piece of craftsmanship with a unique identity.”

Hope all this helps! Take care! 😁✌️
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Bella
Posts: 798
Joined: 4 years ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by Bella » 2 months ago

I acquired a substantial amount of jewelry from my grandmother when she died at the time (I was 18) I had no clue that 585 was 14 karat gold. I don’t think a lot of people realize that even today. I have purchased some pieces at antique auctions that nobody had a clue that it was 14k gold. I had the jewelry for over 2 years before I figured it out. Of course the internet nowadays really helps to identify what is what.
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WTFarmGirl
Posts: 130
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Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by WTFarmGirl » 2 months ago

Here is the FULL extent of what CURRENT laws mandate concerning makers marks, purity marks and requirements:


National Gold and Silver Marking Act
By Stuller | August 15, 2012
National Gold and Silver Marking Act

On October 1, 1981, revised Section 295 of Volume 15 of the United States Code, the law governing requirements for gold and silver marking, , which is commonly known as the National Gold and Silver Marking Act, went into effect. Originally enacted in 1906, this law never required one to indicate quality. However, if quality was affirmatively disclosed, it had to be accurate within one half Karat (without solder) or one Karat (with solder, article assayed in its entirely) from the disclosed mark. Criminal sanctions could be imposed for violations.

In 1961, this Act was amended to require the additional disclosures of the name or registered trademark of the firm responsible for the quality guaranty. This law was amended in 1970 to provide for civil penalties via private legal action.

Now, the fineness tolerances for gold articles are considerably tightened. Signed into law in 1976 and effective on October 1, 1981, Section 295 was revised to further regulate precious metal standards by more stringently specifying the proportion of gold with and without solder, making gold as good as gold.

Since October 1 has passed, the following stricter requirements apply. In the case of gold or any of its alloys imported, exported, or transported through interstate commerce, actual fineness shall not be less by more than 3/1000ths parts (without solder) or 7/1000ths parts (with solder taken into account).

While the law requires that gold and silver carrying a quality mark also carry the registered trademark of the person or organization responsible for the guarantee of quality, there is no United States law requiring that gold or silver be quality marked in the first place. If a quality mark appears, so must the trademark. Whereas a quality mark alone is meaningless, the appearance of a trademark serves to assign the responsibility for fraudulent quality marks.

A quality mark represents the stated standard. The presence of the manufacture’s trademark is an important assurance that the ration of gold to alloy as represented by a stamp on the article is accurate, thus making it conform with the law. On the pragmatic level, such a measure is valuable primarily to distributors and retailers who can hold the manufacturer responsible in case a quality mark is found to be an exaggeration, thereby relieving themselves from responsibility in the chain of distribution. If, however, a quality mark is unaccompanied by a manufacturer’s trademark, it is the distributor and/or retailer who will be held accountable for having passed fraudulently marked goods onto the public.

A trademark is an assurance of quality. It is a permanent record of origin and an assumption of responsibility. It is clearly for the benefit of both distributors and retailers to make certain that each and every gold and silver item purchased is inscribed with a quality mark and is inscribed with a trademark, in accordance with the law. IMPORTANT: The application of this mark is required to be identical to the means used in applying the quality mark, and must be at least as large as and positioned as close as possible to the quality mark.

Requiring that manufacturers remain wholly accountable for the quality of their gold and silver items, this law offers distributors and retailers a degree of assurance in the value of their products. Since tolerance standards are much higher than before, there may be a particular urge on the part of some members of our industry to bypass the requirements of signature presence on their gold and silver goods. Anyone who wants to keep his own standards high should remain alert, demanding that others do not try to side-step the law.

The Federal Trade Commission’s Guides for the Jewelry Industry contain additional prohibitions of which industry members should be aware. JVC members have copies of the National Gold and Silver Marking Act, as well as our recommendations for revision of the current Guides, which we submitted on January 8, 1981. Reference to these Guides and the Stamping Act is advised for full understanding of the law.

--Jewelers Vigilance Committee

JVC’S How to Obtain a Trademark Kit
Prepared Exclusively for the use of JVC

Jewelers Vigilance Committee
25 West 45th Street, Suite 400
New York, NY 10036
(800) JOIN JVC
(212) 997-2002
(212) 532-2217 fax
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Spinoza
Posts: 261
Joined: 7 months ago

Re: IGS stamped on SLC gold jewelry

Post by Spinoza » 2 months ago

@Bella

Sounds like you inherited some nice gold pieces! 😁 Yes, sometimes gold (or silver) is marked with the numeric value of gold percentage. I hope you were pleased to find out the karat value! 👍😁✌️
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